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Socrates

 
 
Although thy pen was silent, mute,  
A sea of knowledge dire  
In thee the world of yore had seized.  
Thy voice was Spirit’s fire.  
All wealth and ease of the world sublime  
Thy deeds were apt to disdain.  
Therefore thy spouse, Xantippe,  
Was tortured by a ceaseless pain.  
Many a foe of giant cloud  
Against thy knowledge stood.  
But gloom saw its doom in thee,  
With thee thy high manhood.

 

Excerpt from Philosopher-Thinkers: The Power-Towers Of The Mind And Poet-Seers: The Fragrance-Hours Of The Heart In The West by Sri Chinmoy.

Wisdom of Socrates

 The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.

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 Our prayers should be for blessings in general, for God knows best what is good for us.

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 All men’s souls are immortal, but the souls of the righteous are immortal and divine.

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 Be slow to fall into friendship; but when thou art in, continue firm and constant.

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Employ your time in improving yourself by other men’s writings, so that you shall gain easily what others have labored hard for.

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 By all means, marry. If you get a good wife, you’ll become happy; if you get a bad one, you’ll become a philosopher.

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 I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled poets to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who deliver all their sublime messages without knowing in the least what they mean.

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 If thou continuest to take delight in idle argumentation thou mayest be qualified to combat with the sophists, but will never know how to live with men.

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 Serenity, regularity, absence of vanity, Sincerity, simplicity, veracity, equanimity, Fixity, non-irritability, adaptability, Humility, tenacity, integrity, nobility, magnanimity, charity, generosity, purity.
Practise daily these eighteen “ities” You will soon attain immortality.

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 The greatest way to live with honor in this world is to be what we pretend to be.

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 The unexamined life is not worth living.

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 One who is injured ought not to return the injury, for on no account can it be right to do an injustice; and it is not right to return an injury, or to do evil to any man, however much we have suffered from him.

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 If all misfortunes were laid in one common heap whence everyone must take an equal portion, most people would be contented to take their own and depart.

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 An honest man is always a child.

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